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in colorectal diseases and access information about colon and rectal cancer from nonprofit and government organizations.

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FAQ

Why should I get screened for colorectal cancer?
Screening tests can find polyps, so they can be removed before they turn into cancer. Screening tests also can find colorectal cancer early—and the earlier cancer is detected the better the chance of a full recovery after treatment.

Which colorectal cancer screening test is right for me?
Discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each type of test with your doctor. Generally, if you are over 50 and have an average risk, which test to use depends on your preferences and medical condition.

A full table of screening guidelines for people with increased risk, high risk and multiple risk factors is available online as part of the American Cancer Society recommendations for colorectal cancer early detection.

What are the symptoms of colorectal cancer?
The most common symptoms of colorectal cancer:

  • a change in bowel habits such as diarrhea, constipation, or narrowing of the stool that lasts for more than a few days
  • rectal bleeding or blood in the stool
  • cramping or gnawing stomach pain
  • decreased appetite
  • vomiting
  • weakness and fatigue
  • jaundice – yellowing of the skin and eyes

If you have any of these symptoms, check with your physician, especially if you are over 50 or have a personal or family history of the disease.

What are current recommendations for the prevention of colorectal cancer?
The American Cancer Society currently offers the following recommendations:

  • Get screened regularly.
  • Maintain a healthy weight throughout life.
  • Adopt a physically active lifestyle.
  • Consume a healthy diet with an emphasis on plant sources.
  • Choose foods and beverages in amounts that help achieve and maintain a healthy weight.
  • Eat 5 or more servings of a variety of vegetables and fruits each day.
  • Choose whole grains in preference to processed (refined) grains.
  • Limit your consumption of processed and red meats.
  • If you drink alcoholic beverages, limit consumption.

What is inflammatory bowel disease?
Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a term for inflammation that is caused by an immune response in the gastrointestinal tract. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are the two most common inflammatory bowel diseases.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is a term for inflammation that is caused by an immune response in the gastrointestinal tract. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease are the two most common inflammatory bowel diseases.

How can I get a referral and make an appointment with the Colorectal Surgery Institute?
You can call our office — 1-818-244-8161 — for help with setting up an appointment with us.

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